Cristina Alcon

Postgraduate Student

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My PhD work in Lindsay’s lab is focused on understanding the impact that antibiotics have on the preterm life gut microbiota. Antibiotics are the most frequently used drugs in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Between 75% and 94% of neonate babies are exposed to antibiotics during their stay in a NICU. More research is needed to understand the impact of antibiotics on the gut bacteria which plays a key role in assuring good health to the infant.

My science journey began some time ago in 2003 when I completed my undergraduate degree in Biochemistry in Valencia (Spain). Later on, I worked as a Research Assistant in several research laboratories in the UK, Spain and France which gave me a broad skill base in laboratory techniques. In 2013 I started working for Lindsay to help set up a probiotic trial in collaboration with Dr Paul Clarke and the NICU of the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. I immediately developed a passion to work in the field of clinical microbiology, and two years later, I started a PhD in Lindsay´s research team.

Hughes K. R., Harnisch L. C., Alcon C., Mitra S., Wright C. J., Ketskemety J., van Sinderen D., Watson A. J., Hall L. J.. (2017)

Bifidobacterium breve reduces apoptotic epithelial cell shedding in an exopolysaccharide and MyD88-dependent manner.

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